The Shining Mock-Ups by Saul Bass

Came across these jems today whilst doing my design rounds. I adore both Stanley Kubrick and Saul Bass with a reserved passion, their works are signature, innovative, striking and fantastic monuments to their eras.

To find them conversing like above makes my occipital lobe tell me heart to throw a little paddy. Saul Bass’s mock ups are fascinating and striking in their roughness, but to see how Kubrick responds to them is equally as fascinating; it’s clear to see that Bass interpreted elements of the film with more significance than kubrick did. Though Bass’ final published poster (top) is excellently suited, conveying the theme and tones of the film, Bass’s Maze Mock (Img2.) really excites me; it has I feel a more prominent sense of mystery and in turn is more of a lure to the viewer, though it doesn’t portray the horror of the film.

Here I combined the mock with the final product to produce an example of what the work may have looked like! 

MAL.

My Finished Editorial

Having come to an end of Visual Communication in Context 1, my final work has been printed off and I’ve fully assembled it! 

I’m really taken aback by my outcome, the work is fantastically crisp and I really feel looking over it now that my message is well reflected and delivered! I’m really surprised by just how striking the shapes and colours make my spread, I would have loved to have tried giving the different surfaces different textures, or perhaps having another type of paper pressed on top, maybe even an experimentation with embossing / bevelling! 

MAL.

Can be seen in higher quality here.

Our Finished Risograph Postcards! 

All printed and cropped here they are! Really, really please with the outcomes here! The lines are all crisp and very premium in appearance.

Just need to get them in the belly band and they’ll be submitted with the rest of my work, good job Team Storm! 

You can see them all in a higher quality here! 

MAL.

Belly Band
Here’s our belly band which I whipped up for the group.
A belly band is just a strip of paper which holds together our card sets! 
I recycled some of the weather symbols from our designs and the typeface is Jayne Hand Print! 
Which funnily enough along with the 100% magenta also features in one of my first successful design pieces: The Strawberry Fox
MAL.

Belly Band

Here’s our belly band which I whipped up for the group.

A belly band is just a strip of paper which holds together our card sets! 

I recycled some of the weather symbols from our designs and the typeface is Jayne Hand Print! 

Which funnily enough along with the 100% magenta also features in one of my first successful design pieces: The Strawberry Fox

MAL.

Here’s the file ready to be input into the Risograph machine! 

The machine creates a master stencil based on the register black areas! 

So when we were printing the black lines, only the black sections should be exposed, as you can see here in picture 2! Then for the magenta to be printed we had to change all the pantone sections to register black of the same opacity! 

The paper will be fed into the machine and we will print all the cards with the black ink first, then we’ll change the colour drum to pantone 806u and go over all the cards with the corresponding design in magenta! 

Because there’s room for error in the alignment of the postcards, the ink often doesn’t quite line up, which actually lends a rather desirable sketchy effect. 

MAL.

Last week the group and I came up with the idea of “the weatherman” as a good poignant character whom could feature in all our works, unifying them without having to do the tricky task of keeping a house style between the five of us. 

We figured out his basic design and the composition of the postcards with what kind of scenarios could be happening, then we agreed we’d all go away compose of two postcards each and meet up again to process and print them! 

Since then this past week I’ve been involved in a cross collaborative project over at university Bournemouth doing some acting work, so with bad planning on my behalf I wasn’t able to meet my group nearly as much as we’d hoped. However to my delight the group have very kindly and maturely produced these works in my absence, and we’ll be working together Wednesday-Thursday to get them all done and ready for print! 

MAL.

mallorypjwood

mallorypjwood:

Letter Press

Letter Press workshop today. Letterpress is a very strait forward form of relief printing, originally used to print books and the likes more recently it’s been recognised for it’s artistic applications. Type-Artists such as Alan Kitching and Anthony Burrill are fond users of the medium. 

We were using a model FAG 405 Control proofing press, presses like these are now a rare commodity, all types of printing press are victims of digital convergence. 

We had a simple process, firstly as a group we decided upon a composition of two letters we wanted to print. The once decided we headed to the printing studio and started making the correct colour ink. These are rubber based inks mixed with a binder. We started with different opacities of blue before adding red to the last two runs. 

The ink is applied on the roller, an the letter piece  is secured in place (back to front) with metal blocks known as ‘furniture’, adjustable furniture blocks that require an alan key to widen/shrink are called ‘quoins’. Paper is secured on a roller and is manually pulled over the letterforms, transferring the ink across. This is then repeated with careful adjusting of the letter forms and the paper so that the letter lands in the correct place.

MAL.